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of this place. in october of 2009 i came with my crew for three days just as an experiment and film in the city just as an outsider. talked to a few people. absolutely riveretted by the people and the plays. i thought there's definitely a movie here. we need to make a film in detroit. host: when impacted, i read your father had an impact on you watching him and his business over the years. guest: , that's right, my father is had a manufacturing company. he really like in the 1980s with the rise in japan had to innovate and come up up with new ideas and making it difficult to create products. he started engineering complicated things that couldn't be replicated or stolen or easily made overseas. that's now his business arrived. i kind of had a front row seat to what it was like going you in the 1980s. how he survived was interesting it was all about being nimble and innovative. which i think detroit needs and the rest of the country pretty much needs right now. host: his business partners over the years, around detroit moved out of there to mexico or some other place other than the united st
based? >> new york city. >> which of those documentaries made it biggest? >> jesus camp. we made a film called "jesus camp." we lost to al gore convenient truth. we all knew we were going to lose. it really sort of struck a nerve. it was really a look at the evangelical right through the eyes of children who are being home schooled and creationism, etcetera. it was at that time in 2007 a real window into this world. we impact judgment on the kids. sort of put a face on the nameless christian right. christian right responsible for electing george bush. for us, we went in and met these children and their families. we realized pretty quickly that these were the so-called foot soldiers for the right wing of the republican party. they also just believers and religious people and you know, going to the beat of their own drum. really, it was eye opening for us. we really tried to just paint the picture of how things are with these communities without passing any judgment. >> i saw that documentary and he question as i was watching, why did this camp let you in? >> the families are proud how
>> this week on "q&a," steve inskeep discusses his book, "instant city: life and death in karachi." >> steve inskeep, when did you first go to work for npr? >> i had been freelancing a while, and hired me to cover politics. i would cover anything that needed done that nobody else would do. on my first full day there, i got on a plan to cover the new hampshire primary. i have been doing it ever since. i have been sent to cover plant cresses, wars, and i really enjoy myself. >> why radio? >> ipad started in high school in radio. my brother got on staff. i figured if my older brother could do it, i could do it. i got on staff. i called football games and basketball games. in college, i got paid $10 a game to the demand for high school and football games, i discover public radio at the same time. i was more of a news guy. i fell in love with npr in particular. i had a saturday morning shift in kentucky. i had to get up, go in, turn the radio on and put on national programs on the air. i got to sit there and listen to scott simon, weekend edition, for two hours. he is a brilliant broad
and an otherwise industrial city, one of the big car manufacturers add that time, there was a certain amount of drift between the two. it was great fun. i hung out with a lot of the -- all of the reporters there except for me were oxford graduates. i learned a lot. i learned a lot from them. a very good time. i came in on my day off. the editor was a man named to w. harford thomas. i came there to pick up my mail because it was my fixed address, i was moving from one rooming house to another. sometimes only half a day, but i had one day off a week. this was a saturday. i went to pick up my mail, and i was wearing a t-shirt. it was a summer. when i picked up my mail, when i came into the office the next day there was a note in my pigeon hole from w. harford thomas that said, mr. safer, we at "the mail" generally prefer dark clothing. >> if it had been a dark t- shirt, you would have been alright. >> he meant -- and certainly not with a pink tie. >> there are always those moments in life that make a difference and change everything. what was the first one for you? >> certainly the day -- i was
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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